Reading cigarette dating codes

Generally, this awareness is brief; it's used for a joke or two and then never mentioned again.Used this way, it's Lampshade Hanging as applied to Paratext. Compare with other metafictional devices, particularly Painting the Medium, which uses Paratext and artifacts to tell the story, and Reading Ahead in the Script which is exactly what it sounds like. Words -- Unusual words on put & take: Pool, San Farian, Grab, In, Out, Tak All, and Put All. (Click here for more information about the musical piece.) Players ante into a pot and take turns spinning the top. If the top lands with T1 showing (or "take one"), T2 or T3, the player who spun it would win (take) 1, 2 or 3 chips, respectively, from the pot. RIGHT-CLICK THE MUSIC NOTES so that while you are viewing this page, you will be entertained by hearing the 1929 "Put and Take" jazz-swing musical composition performed by Joe Venuti's Blue Four, Eddie Lang on guitar.It's also a wonderful thing to play with, and that is what Medium Awareness does; the characters acknowledge and interact with elements and conventions of the medium that shouldn't technically "exist" in-universe.Suddenly the characters can hear the ominous background music or the disembodied narration, they can read the subtitles at the bottom of your screen, and they can tell when it's almost time for a commercial break.Put and Take is one of many forms of Teetotums, which are any gaming spinning top.

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Look, this talk is all getting very complicated, and we've got a real problem to deal with here.' Several members run to window and look out. Cut to studio: the members run to a door and open it.

Left the Background Music On is a specific inversion.

Fourth-Wall Observer is what happens when a particular character has this on full-time and the rest do not.

Each player would contribute chips, coins or currency to a pot. So, for example, if "1P" and an "R" appeared, it would mean a pair of kings! As far as I could determine, originally from France and probably for the game Pinochle. One issue I have is that if you tighten the handle (as you normally would), the upper level presses against the lower level, so the upper level won't move independently. And here, which shows the company's lighter in the three upper pictures, and the other pictures are of the bi-level Put & Take made from some of the same parts. (Bosch-Lavalette was an old German-French partnership firm which made a wide variety of light engineering precision work, largely connected with fuel injection pumps and small electrical equipment, and large petrol engines. Similar to the one above -- made by the same person, modern, aluminum, 1-1/4," 12 grams. Near the handle, the patent number 33471 is engraved. Proudly made at the Crisloid factory in Providence, RI." Modern Put and Take dice. If two Ps are rolled, the player takes the entire pot (as in Take ALL). Made by Koplow Games Inc., Massachusetts, made in China. Die 1: 1 2 3 4 5 All Die 2: Put Take Put Take Put Take Rules are on the back of the container. Thanks, E." "Put & Take spinning top / Teetotum Wooden handmade, eigth sides 4,5cm long and 2,2cm diameter TA: take all T3: take three P1: Put one T2: Take two AP: All put P3: Put three T1: Take one P4: Put four Spin well, 40 seconds over glass surface" "New spinning top for Parta Ola (Put and Take), the traditional spinning top game.

I have found 1921 to be the earliest use of the term "Put & Take." The spread and popularity of Put & Takes was a true "craze," a term applied to Put & Takes even then. Lavalette, a French firm, and Bosch, a German firm, partnered between WW I and WW II.) Unusual bi-level top with 8 colored balls. This piece is in all original pre-owned condition age related wear and marks. Same as top #4 in the chart above, except one side is COLON, not COLIN. described it as, "Vintage 6 sided Bi-level "Odds On" Spinner, Circa 1920s. The top level sides are marked with the odds in this order: " E [Even], 2-1, 4-1, 5-1, 6-1, 8-1." The bottom level is marked with the symbols in this order: crown, heart, spade, anchor, diamond, club.. Looks to be made of brass with a silver coloured finish. The above three pictures show how a Put and Take can be rigged for cheating. One unusual rule: "If a PUT and an ALL are rolled, then the player puts in an amount equal to the entire pot." While unusual, I have seen this rule mentioned many times. Per seller: "The bidding is for ONE dice only, I have shown 2 in the photo to show more faces of the dice. This is my version of a game I loved as a child called "Put & Take". Hand lathed of aluminum, well balanced for long spins.

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